Tools For Beginning Quilters

02.02.2020   /   byFree Designs Admin
Our friend Phoebe at Quiltedpig.com has started a youtube channel. Her first video is on tools you will need to become a quilter. Check out the video. If you like it please comment, like or subscribe! She will be making many more.
Go Phoebe!

Full Transcript:

hi there it’s Phoebe from quilted Pig
00:14
your day to talk to you about a few of
00:16
the tools that you need to get started
00:17
quilting first we’re gonna start out
00:20
with meat a cutting mat this one is 18
00:22
by 24 and it is the size that I wouldn’t
00:26
recommend going any smaller than this
00:28
for your big cutting cutting strips and
00:31
things like that one underneath it is I
00:33
believe 24 by 36 and so it’s a nice good
00:36
size that lets you cut either direction
00:38
the next thing you need is a ruler to
00:41
cut on that cutting edge
00:43
I like one like this a nice long one
00:48
it’s long enough that when the fabrics
00:50
folded in half you can cut a strip all
00:52
the way across the fabric this one’s six
00:55
and a half inches wide which is
00:56
something that if you’re new to cutting
00:58
you need to be sure that you’re paying
01:00
attention to whether you’re on the 1/2
01:01
inch side or the not having it slice
01:03
this one is a half of that one so it’s
01:07
12 and a half inches long it’s really
01:09
nice to take to workshops or if you’re
01:11
working with pre cuts things like that
01:13
another ruler that eventually you’ll
01:15
need excuse my swing them around is a
01:18
square up ruler you use this ruler to
01:21
lay it down on the block and trim off
01:24
any weird things that might be sticking
01:26
out make sure your ruler excuse me your
01:28
block is square that way when you sew
01:30
your blocks together they’ll all go
01:31
together evenly now additionally there
01:34
are tons and tons of odd shaped rulers
01:38
for doing specialty blocks like a
01:40
Dresden Plate or a fan and triangles
01:42
hexagons all kinds of things we can talk
01:45
about those later the next thing you
01:47
need to consider is a rotary cutter now
01:50
I have a few different models here for
01:52
you to see and I thought I’d show you
01:54
kind of the differences among them this
01:56
one is the original classic looking row
01:59
recurrent and this particular one
02:01
doesn’t actually have a blade in it but
02:03
the way it works is you use your thumb
02:04
or your finger to retract this
02:06
blackening which exposes the blade and
02:09
then you can cut this I believe is a 20
02:12
millimeter it might be 25 mostly what I
02:15
use though is a 45 millimeter now this
02:19
one is an ice cutter it’s
02:21
to be ergonomic it doesn’t work right
02:24
for me because I’m left-handed but I’m
02:25
going to show you how it works it has a
02:28
push button right here and push it
02:31
forward and that pushes the blade
02:33
forward so now it’s exposed and you can
02:35
cut with it when you want to retract the
02:37
blade you push this button and it clicks
02:40
back into space and this is why it
02:42
didn’t particularly work well for me
02:44
because I’m left-handed I would find
02:46
that my finger would inadvertently hit
02:49
the button and close the blade while I
02:50
was kind but the one that I use the most
02:54
is one like this and it also has a
02:57
button mechanism but you use the button
02:59
to either lock it where you can’t open
03:03
it at all or you can push the button and
03:05
then you can open it like you want but
03:08
you can’t lock it open by pushing the
03:10
same button on this the button is far
03:12
enough forward that no matter which side
03:15
you’re on you’re not going to
03:16
accidentally push it but either way you
03:19
should get whatever rotary cutter feels
03:21
most comfortable in your hands after
03:25
rotary Turner’s you’re going to need
03:26
scissors I like a big pair pair of
03:30
dressmaking shears or if I need to cut
03:33
something big with a big scissors
03:39
these are nice if you’re cutting out
03:41
details shapes like appliques or
03:44
hexagons for English paper piecing and
03:47
then I keep a pair like this right next
03:50
to my sewing machine for nipping threads
03:52
again find scissors that are going to
03:55
feel comfortable in your hand scissors
03:57
that you would feel comfortable using
04:00
and just get those after that you’re
04:04
gonna need some pins now I like I
04:06
believe they’re called dress maker find
04:08
pins and I like them because they are
04:11
extra long and they’re thin and the
04:14
reason I like that is because when
04:16
you’re doing precision piecing and
04:17
you’re pinning through a seam to match
04:22
up points or something like that it
04:24
won’t distort it as you you know as you
04:27
move it along it’ll stay together these
04:29
do not have any head on them which if
04:31
you’re having if you have Corbitt in
04:33
your sewing space I don’t
04:34
necessarily recommend because I stepped
04:36
on one one time and it was not what i
04:39
started using after that happened was
04:42
these plastic flower headed pins now
04:45
they have a plastic thing on em so you
04:47
cannot iron but again the actual pin
04:50
portion is about an inch and a quarter
04:52
long which is great you can get far back
04:56
and they’re also very thin so they’re
04:59
not going to distort the seams and the
05:01
points as you’re doing it next thing you
05:05
need to consider is starch and an iron
05:07
this is the iron that I use right now I
05:10
also have a travel iron use again what’s
05:13
most comfortable for you if you’re going
05:15
to be doing a lot try to look the one
05:17
that’s lightweight they can get pretty
05:20
heavy I personally like to pre wash my
05:22
fabrics and when I’m done pretty washing
05:25
them when I pulled out of the dryer and
05:26
you know shake them out and everything
05:27
and then I like to iron and starch them
05:30
know if the fabric feels like it’s gonna
05:32
give me trouble or if I know my pattern
05:35
has a lot of bias seams or bias cuts
05:37
otherwise I really like to use this
05:40
heavy starch this can be found at the
05:42
grocery store this one comes from your
05:46
local quilt shop and it’s a little
05:48
lighter it has a nice smell to it it’s
05:51
real easy to use but it works great for
05:54
if you’re piecing a blog so you’re
05:57
folding the seam over you know the judge
05:59
with the starch and then iron it down it
06:02
stays flat and it stays crisp and it
06:03
stays nice so once you’ve done that you
06:09
need to look at Brett’s you can choose
06:12
from among cotton all-purpose which I
06:16
believe is a polyester covered cotton or
06:19
a straight-up polyester it just depends
06:22
on what you’re looking for in your quilt
06:25
I like to match the colors to my quilt
06:27
because I feel like that keeps me from
06:30
distracting you don’t see the stitches
06:31
in it the important part is that it be a
06:36
relatively thin thread so that when you
06:38
press it back that the thread isn’t
06:41
taking up bulk in your seam allowance
06:43
and causing that to be bulky
06:45
now something to consider is these are
06:48
all on spools this is on a comb this
06:52
actually isn’t for piecing it’s for
06:55
embroidery and one-armed quilting but I
06:58
wanted to show you an example if your
07:01
thread pin which is where the threads
07:03
that’s on your machine is up and down
07:05
like this which it is on most older
07:07
machines you really want a spool that
07:12
allows the thread comes off this way the
07:14
spool spins and I think it’s twisted if
07:17
your spool pin goes at an angle or if
07:21
you’re using a comb and there are brands
07:23
to make cones that are smaller like this
07:25
and it’s on the side you’ll want a
07:31
thread stand and that enables the threat
07:34
to come smoothly off of this that again
07:36
if your machine uses the cones if it’s
07:39
made to use cones you can use the
07:41
smaller cones directly on the spool and
07:45
last but not least something that we
07:48
don’t want to think about that we need
07:49
is a seam ripper this is an older style
07:53
seam ripper the pointy end just comes
07:56
out of the cap and then you put it on
07:58
backwards and you get to picking your
08:01
stitches out and I have a couple of
08:03
newer styles here this one you can put
08:05
the lid back on put it away most newer
08:08
styles here this one is a little bigger
08:11
it also has a rubber tip so you can use
08:15
it like an eraser once you’ve got little
08:17
bits of threaded ribs on up gets them
08:20
off the fabric so there’s that one
08:22
and then this one is a little more
08:24
ergonomic so if you’re gonna be ripping
08:26
out a lot of seams this might be a good
08:28
twist for you and it’s got a bigger
08:30
handle it’s easier for someone with
08:32
bigger hands to use so hopefully this
08:36
gives you an idea of the tools that you
08:37
need to get started quilting I hope you
08:39
enjoyed the video if you did I hope that
08:41
you’ll hit like I hope that you’ll
08:43
subscribe and consider watching some of
08:44
my other videos on basic quilting thank
08:46
you and have a good day bye bye
08:55
you